Monday, January 2, 2012

The .xxx domain.

Promotional logo for the .xxx domain.  Source.

So,

As of December 6th, 2011, the .xxx domain has been available for websites with adult content.  A domain is like .com or .org, for those that may not know.  In the spirit of my holiday posts, I shall keep it short and simply offer my two cents on the matter.

<rant>

This development has me somewhat miffed.  Frankly, it should not have taken this long for .xxx to exist as a domain. From what I have read, it seems that conservative influences existed when the original list of top level domains was created, and it was felt that having a .xxx domain would legitimize internet pornography.  Naturally without an official label, pornography never made it onto the internet, and this most marvelous series of tubes maintains only the highest of moral standards.

Wait a second.  Hold on to your monocles and top hats, people, I have just received some horrifying news.  There is porn on the internet!  Done locking your doors and barring your windows?  Good.  Let us continue.

Had pornography been given an official domain from the start, it would have been far easier to sort everything out from the beginning.  Content filtration would be especially easy, as one could simply block all .xxx domain access in business or family settings.  I would like to believe that pornography would migrate to its domain, and .com could be used for the commercial arm of adult entertainment companies, but I think it is far more likely that it will continue to be a mess for the foreseeable future.

Of course, the groups originally opposed to the .xxx domain have gotten their knickers into a twist over the development.  From what I have read, the main opposition is that reputable domains are purchasing their corresponding .xxx domain to protect against defamation.  There is also the less sensible argument that the amount of pornography on the internet could double, with companies having a .com and a .xxx domain.  I believe this is needless hysteria, but there it is.  I also believe that organisations like Harvard University purchasing its corresponding .xxx domain is an example of an established practice of buying related domains to protect against defamation, and should not be a big deal.

To sum this all up, I'd like to direct you to an article from the satirical news site The Onion, saying that most of our problems could be solved by stopping and thinking for two seconds.

</rant>

NM
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